RN to BSN nurse

Bachelor of Science inNursing

Program summary

Advance your knowledge of theory and your clinical skills while making yourself more marketable in the current health care industry. This online degree program is for currently licensed Registered Nurses (RN) with an associate degree or diploma who would like to continue their education with a BSN.

Application deadline

Apply by October 31 to start January 13

Credits and costs

120 Credits$626/$671 per credit

Nationally Recognized

US News and World Report Bachelor's badge
Our bachelor's degrees are highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

Build Your Career with an Online RN to BSN

Health care is moving ahead; shouldn’t your career? As nursing becomes more complex, a Bachelor of Science in Nursing can help move your career forward. Our RN to BSN program builds and expands on the RN competencies needed to lead change and positively affect the health care industry. Earning a BSN degree can also properly prepare you to attend graduate school.

Why the RN to BSN Online Program at Penn State?

Take classes anywhere — With Penn State World Campus, all RN to BSN courses are online and you can fulfill your clinical requirements near your home. You can also choose to take your nursing courses at an accelerated pace for ultimate flexibility through our Accelerated RN to BSN format. If you live near a Penn State campus and wish to participate in both classroom and online learning, you can blend the two experiences while earning your degree.

This program is CCNE Accredited

Recognition — The Penn State RN to BSN program is one of the top online programs in the nation. The Penn State Ross and Carol Nese College of Nursing is approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing. The baccalaureate degree program in nursing, master’s degree program in nursing, Doctor of Nursing Practice program, and post-graduate APRN certificate programs at The Pennsylvania State University are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001, 202-887-6791. Further information can be found at www.ccneaccreditation.org.

Beyond a degree — You can enhance your professional credentials by earning one of our specialized certificates as you move from an RN to a BSN. Choose from certificates in Nursing Management, Nursing Informatics, or Nursing Forensics to help you set yourself apart from others on the career ladder. Some of the credits you earn in the certificate programs may be applied toward the requirements for your BSN degree. In addition, some courses in the certificate programs may apply toward graduate work or may satisfy continuing professional education requirements.

Who Should Apply?

If you are a registered nurse with a valid United States RN license and you want to advance in your career, the online RN to BSN program may be the right choice for you. The BSN degree can help you move up to a supervisory role or build a solid foundation to become a clinical nurse specialist, nurse anesthetist, nurse-midwife, or nurse practitioner.

Courses

The RN to BSN program is 120 credits. To earn this Bachelor of Science in Nursing, you must successfully complete:

  • 42 prescribed core course credits
  • 45 General Education credits
  • 33 additional core credits (earned by portfolio verification for licensed RNs)

The degree's prescribed core courses focus on contemporary issues in the field of nursing. Subjects of study include anatomy, chemistry, data management, ethics, health assessment, human development and family studies, human resources management, microbiology, nursing research, nutrition, and sociology.

Some nursing courses are available in an accelerated seven-week format.

Program Requirements: 120 credits
You may transfer credits into this program from another accredited institution. However, to earn this Bachelor of Science in Nursing, you must earn 36 of the last 60 credits from Penn State.

General Education: 45 credits
(20–22 of these 45 credits are included in the requirements for the major.)
(See General Education in the curriculum.)

Requirements for the Major: 92–93 credits
(This includes 20–22 credits of General Education courses.)

Electives: 2–5 credits

Prescribed Courses (22 credits minimum)

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to principles and methods of nursing research and application of, research evidence to practice.

  • 3
    credits

    Designed to extend the RN student's knowledge and skills in health assessment and physical examination across the lifespan.

  • 3
    credits

    An introduction to nursing informatics focusing on technology applications to the nursing profession.

  • 3
    credits

    Transition to baccalaureate education and professional nursing practice, emphasizing leadership, management, and issues influencing nursing education and practice.

  • 4
    credits

    Study of the concepts of family and community based nursing care emphasizing multicultural influences on health practices.

  • 3
    credits

    In-depth study and application of the theoretical principles and roles of adult clients and families with complex healthcare needs.

  • 3
    credits

    A project-based capstone clinical course for the RN student with a focus on the application of nursing concepts and the RN's development of future career goals. The course is designed to provide opportunity for students to synthesize and apply the art and science of nursing to health promotion and disease prevention in culturally diverse populations in varied clinical settings of the global community.

Portfolio Assessment (33 credits)

The following courses comprise credits earned by credit by portfolio assessment for RNs.

  • 3
    credits

    Designed to explore the illness component of health with emphasis on the pathophysiological and psychosocial aspects.

  • 4
    credits

    Introduction to the nursing process, clinical competencies and psychosocial skills.

  • 2
    credits

    Introduces the students to the profession of nursing, the science of nursing, and the use of information technology in health care.

    • Prerequisite

      BIOL 161 and BIOL 163

  • 4
    credits

    Therapeutic nursing care of the adult client in a variety of primarily medical-surgical settings.

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to pharmacological concepts and identifies the pharmacodynamics of major classifications of drugs.

    • Prerequisite

      NURS 225 and NURS 230 or approval of the program.

    • Recommended Corequisites

      NURS 301 and NURS 310

  • 3
    credits

    Focuses on common health problems and nursing intervention for children and adolescents.

    • Prerequisite

      NURS 225 and NURS 230 and NURS 305

  • 3
    credits

    Nursing concerns and intervention in promoting the health of the older adult.

  • 3
    credits

    Therapeutic nursing care of the childbearing family and gynecological client.

  • 4
    credits

    In-depth study of care of patients with acute and complex health problems, utilizing evidence-based practice.

    • Prerequisite

      NURS 305 and NURS 350

  • 4
    credits

    Emphasizes clinical application of mental health theory in nursing care of patients with acute and chronic mental health problems.

Supporting Courses and Related Courses (select 6 credits)

  • 3
    credits

    Interdisciplinary discussion of violence and its perpetrators, victims, and impact on society as well as possible solutions for violence reduction.

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    This course covers the importance of environmental health on individual and community health, the effects of environmental hazards on diverse populations and the impact of climate change on disease.

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Provides an introduction to the forensic health sciences, forensic nursing, and the nursing role in the scientific investigation of violence.

    • Prerequisite

      NURS 225, NURS 230, NURS 250

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Examines nurses' role of recognizing patterns of injury. Evidence collection procedures are examined from collection to courtroom presentation, includes autopsy.

    • Prerequisite or concurrent

      NURS 245 and NURS 409

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    A seminar to discuss the current topics, trends, and research related to forensic nursing, including evidence-based research, public policy issues, media-related events, regulatory considerations, professional responsibilities, and career planning.

    • Prerequisite or concurrent

      NURS 410

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to organizational theory and principles of practice in the administration of nursing services and patient care.

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Analysis of information systems to manage nursing service organizations. Includes financial management, the budgeting processes, and productivity measurement.

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Human resource management and related factors in nursing service organizations.

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Focuses on the application of management principles in the role of the nurse manager.

    • Prerequisite

      NURS 430

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Focuses on the impact of and the nursing care of persons experiencing acute trauma and/or critical illness.

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    A case-based collaboratory designed for the exploration and analysis of the ethical dilemmas facing health care informatics practitioners.

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    An exploration of clinical informatics tools to support informatics practice.

    • Prerequisite

      NURS 357

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 1–9
    credits

    Designed to provide students with in-depth study and practice in clinical specialty area of choice. Students work with a faculty member in the development of course objectives and goals and with a clinical preceptor to accomplish them.

  • 1–9
    credits

    Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.

Courses Meeting General Education Requirements

  • 4
    credits

    Anatomy of a mammal, with special reference to that of man.

    • GN

      This course can be used to satisfy the Natural Sciences (GN) requirement.

  • 3
    credits

    Normal structure and function of the animal body, with special emphasis on human body systems.

  • 3
    credits

    Principles of communication, implemented through analysis and evaluation of messages, with some attention to formal speaking and group discussion.

    • GWS

      This course can be used to satisfy the Writing/Speaking (GWS) requirement.

  • 3
    credits

    Basic concepts and quantitative relations.

    • GN

      This course can be used to satisfy the Natural Sciences (GN) requirement.

  • 1
    credit

    Introduction to quantitative experimentation in chemistry.

    • Prerequisite or Concurrent

      CHEM 110 or CHEM 106

  • 3
    credits

    Instruction and practice in writing expository prose that shows sensitivity to audience and purpose.

    • GWS

      The credits earned in this course may be applied toward the Writing/Speaking (GWS) requirement.

    • 3
      credits

      Introduces students to the types of writing that social scientists typically do in the workplace, including research proposals, proper citation practices, literature reviews, and research reports.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Instruction in writing persuasive arguments about significant issues in the humanities.

      • GWS

        This course can be used to satisfy the Writing/Speaking (GWS) requirement.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Writing for students in scientific and technical disciplines.

      • Prerequisite

        ENGL 15, ESL 15, ENGL 30, and 4th Semester standing OR ENGL 137H, ENGL 138T, and 4th Semester standing

      • GWS

        This course can be used to satisfy the Writing/Speaking (GWS) requirement.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Writing reports and other common forms of business communication.

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to psychosocial and family development at all stages of the individual and family life cycle.

    • GS

      This course can be used to satisfy the Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS) requirement.

  • 3
    credits

    A survey course in microbiology for non-majors, this course focuses on the roles of microbes in human health and disease, agriculture, biotechnology, and other areas of societal impact.

    • GN

      This course can be used to satisfy the Natural Sciences (GN) requirement.

  • 1
    credit

    Selected techniques used to observe, identify, and count bacteria; effects of chemical and physical agents on microorganisms. The combination of MICRB 106 GN and 107 GN must be taken to receive General Education credit in biology.

    • Prerequisite

      MICRB 106

    • GN

      The credits earned in this course may be applied toward the Natural Sciences (GN) requirement.

  • 3
    credits

    The nutrients: food sources and physiological functions as related to human growth and well-being throughout life; current nutrition issues.

    • GHW

      This course can be used to satisfy the Health and Wellness (GHW) requirement.

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to general psychology; principles of human behavior and their applications.

    • GS

      The credits earned in this course may be applied toward the Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS) requirement.

    • 3
      credits

      The nature and characteristics of human societies and social life.

      • GS

        This course can be used to satisfy the Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS) requirement.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Current social problems such as economic, racial, and gender inequalities; social deviance and crime; population, environmental, energy, and health problems.

      • GS

        The credits earned in this course may be applied toward the Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS) requirement.

  • 4
    credits

    Descriptive Statistics, frequency distributions, probability and normal distributions, statistical inference, linear regression, and correlation.

    • GQ

      This course can be used to satisfy the Quantification (GQ) requirement.

General Education Requirements

Some General Education requirements may be satisfied by courses required for the major. Students should work with an adviser to select courses.

  • Foundations: 15 credits  
    All courses require a grade of C or better. Inter-Domain courses may not be used for foundations requirements. 
    • Writing/Speaking: 9 credits 
    • Quantification: 6 credits 
      3-6 credits are selected from mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics; 3 credits may be selected from computer science or symbolic logic. 
  • Knowledge Domains: 15 credits  
    Inter-Domain courses may not be used for knowledge domain requirements.
    • Health and Wellness (GHW): 3 credits 
    • Natural Sciences (GN): 3 credits 
    • Arts (GA): 3 credits 
    • Humanities (GH): 3 credits 
    • Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS): 3 credits  
  • Integrative Studies: 6 credits
    • Inter-Domain course work: 6 credits  
  • Exploration: 9 credits 
    • Natural Sciences (GN) (may be Inter-Domain): 3 credits
    • GA, GH, GN, GS, and Inter-Domain courses: 6 credits  
      May include 3 credits of World Language course work beyond the requirements of the student’s degree program or at the 12th credit level, whichever is higher.

These General Education Requirements are for students who started in summer 2023 or later. Students who started earlier can review the prior version of the general education requirements

Among the degree requirements, students should incorporate at least:

  • 3 credits in U.S. cultures
  • 3 credits in international (IL) cultures
  • 3 credits in writing-across-the-curriculum courses

The course list includes only courses offered by World Campus. An official degree audit or the recommended academic plan for this program may include additional course options and detailed requirements. All students are expected to complete at least 36 Penn State credits to earn this degree. Please consult an academic adviser for details.

Course Availability

If you're ready to see when your courses will be offered, visit our public LionPATH course search (opens in new window) to start planning ahead.

Costs and Financial Aid

Undergraduate Tuition

Undergraduate tuition is calculated based on the number of credits for which you register and the number of total credits you have accrued at or transferred to Penn State.

Tuition is due shortly after each semester begins and rates are assessed every semester of enrollment.

2023–24 Academic Year Rates

Tuition rates for the fall 2023, spring 2024, and summer 2024 semesters.

How many credits do you plan to take per semester?If you have 59 or fewer creditsIf you have 60 or more credits
11 or fewer$626 per credit$671 per credit
12–19$7,602 per semester$8,206 per semester

Undergraduate students taking more than 19 credits will be charged the flat tuition rate plus the regular per credit hour rate for each credit above 19. 

2024–25 Academic Year Rates

Tuition rates for the fall 2024, spring 2025, and summer 2025 semesters.

How many credits do you plan to take per semester?If you have 59 or fewer creditsIf you have 60 or more credits
11 or fewer$632 per credit$678 per credit
12–19$7,678 per semester$8,288 per semester

Undergraduate students taking more than 19 credits will be charged the flat tuition rate plus the regular per credit hour rate for each credit above 19. 

Financial Aid and Military Benefits

Some students may qualify for financial aid. Take the time to research financial aid, scholarships, and payment options as you prepare to apply. Military service members, veterans, and their spouses or dependents should explore these potential military education benefits and financial aid opportunities, as well.

To view the detailed list of cost of attendance elements, select “World Campus” as the location on the tuition site.

How to Apply

Deadlines and Important Dates

Your degree application, including receipt of all transcripts, must be received by the following deadlines to be considered complete.

  • Spring DeadlineApply by October 31 to start January 13
  • Summer DeadlineApply by March 15, 2025, to start May 19, 2025
  • Fall DeadlineApply by June 30, 2025, to start August 25, 2025

New students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA by March 1. Please visit the Office of Student Aid website for more information about applying for financial aid and recommended deadlines.

Admissions Help

Thank you for your interest in applying to this program. Contact an admissions counselor to discuss your educational goals, financial aid options, and application deadlines.

Admission Requirements

To apply for this program, you must be a high school graduate or have completed your GED.

Licensure

All RN to BSN applicants must have completed an RN program or have an RN license to practice in the United States. Prior to enrollment in certain courses, all RN to BSN students must have an active RN license in the state in which course work with clinical hours is completed.

Internationally educated students that already have an RN license to practice in the United States are welcome to apply.

What You Need

Applications are submitted electronically and include a nonrefundable application fee. You will need the following items to complete your application:

High school transcripts or GED transcript. First-year applicants are required to submit Self-Reported Academic Records (SRAR). Official high school transcripts will only be required at the time a student accepts an offer of admission to Penn State.

Official college or university transcripts, if you attended another institution, and/or official military transcripts (if applicable). (All college or university transcripts are required regardless of the length of time that has passed, the grades earned, or the accreditation of the institutions attended. Acceptance of transfer credit toward your degree is subject to final approval by the academic department. For detailed information, see the Transfer Students page.)

Transcripts not in English must be accompanied by a certified translation. Please send your transcripts by mail or electronically through Parchment, eScrip-Safe, or the National Student Clearinghouse directly to Penn State from the college/university where coursework was attempted.

Submit official documents by mail to:

Undergraduate Admissions Office
The Pennsylvania State University
201 Shields Building
University Park PA 16802

English Proficiency. The language of instruction at Penn State is English. With some exceptions, international applicants must take and submit scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Minimum test scores and exceptions are found in the English Language Proficiency section on the Undergraduate Admissions International Requirements page. Visit the TOEFL website for testing information. Penn State's institutional code is 2660.

Start Your Application

Former Penn State students may not need to complete the admissions application. Please visit our Returning Students page for instructions. 

If this is your first time applying to Penn State, you'll need to complete the following steps:

  1. Review the application instructions before beginning.
  2. Complete the online application and submit all official documents.
  3. Pay the application fee.

Checking Your Status

You can check the status of your application by using the same login information established for the online application form and choosing "MyPennState — Check Application Status." Your decision letter (confirming your acceptance or denial) will be mailed four to six weeks after receipt of all application materials. An admissions counselor will contact you if additional information is required.

Technical Requirements 

Review the technical requirements for this degree program.

Ready to Learn More?

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Ready to take the next step toward your Penn State bachelor's degree?

Apply by October 31 to start January 13. How to Apply 

Career Opportunities for BSN Graduates

A group of nurses sitting at a table together having a meeting

You can use the knowledge gained from this program and the support of Penn State career resources to pursue careers in a variety of fields, depending on your goals.


Job Titles Related to This Degree

Penn State RN to BSN graduates can choose from numerous career opportunities and work in different aspects of the health care industry. The following roles are often held by people with this type of degree:

  • Emergency Department RN (Emergency Department Registered Nurse)
  • Progressive Care Unit RN (Progressive Care Unit Registered Nurse)
  • School Nurse
  • Staff RN (Staff Registered Nurse)

Employment Outlook for Occupational Fields Related to This Degree

Estimates of employment growth and total employment are provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and are subject to change. While these occupations are often pursued by graduates with this degree, individual outcomes may vary depending on a variety of factors. Penn State World Campus cannot guarantee employment in a given occupation.

Registered Nurses

5.6%
employment growth (10 years)
3,072,700
total employment

Career Services to Set You Up for Success

Student having a virtual meeting on a laptop with a career counselor

From the day you're accepted as a student, you can access resources and tools provided by Penn State World Campus Career Services to further your career. These resources are beneficial whether you're searching for a job or advancing in an established career.

  • Opportunities to connect with employers
  • Career counselor/coach support
  • Occupation and salary information
  • Internships
  • Graduate school resources 

Accelerated Courses

With Penn State World Campus, you already have a great amount of flexibility as to where and when you complete your course work.

However, if you are looking for additional options in the amount of time it takes to complete your degree, accelerated RN to BSN course work could be for you. You will receive the same quality instruction in a format that is compressed into seven-week sessions, allowing you to complete some of your nursing courses more quickly.

For ultimate flexibility of your program completion, the accelerated nursing courses can be taken in conjunction with our standard semester-length courses. Choose whichever format is most convenient for you at a particular time — you won't have to quit your job or change your life to earn a high-quality undergraduate degree from Penn State's well-regarded Ross and Carol Nese College of Nursing.

Clinical Requirements

The clinical requirement involves working with an individual within a community to gain professional experience, and it can be completed within or outside of a health care system.

RN to BSN Clinical Requirements

We are pleased to announce that we have recently significantly reduced our clinical hour requirement from 180 to 45 total program hours.

As an RN to BSN student in the Penn State Ross and Carol Nese College of Nursing, you will be required to complete a clinical experience in the final capstone course (NURS 475) to complement your course work. The clinical experience is designed by each student and will differ from those pre-licensure programs. The main goal of the experience is for you to grow professionally in order to take the next step in a successful career.

The clinical experience will provide you with an exciting opportunity to analyze and evaluate aspects of health care that are aligned with your career goals. Even for experienced nurses working in the field, the clinical requirements can provide valuable opportunities to train in new departments or move up to higher-level responsibilities.

The following course includes credits for your clinical experience:

Clinical Experience Courses**
Course Number and Name Clinical Description Clinical Hours Required
NURS 475: Integrated Concepts in Nursing Practice This clinical experience involves working with an individual within a community, and it can be completed within or outside of a health care system. Some of the clinical time/experience is also embedded in the course. (3 credits) 45 clinical hours

**Please note that a valid and current RN license is needed in order to enroll in the clinical course work.

Getting Started with a Clinical Experience

Your clinical experience will be a "health–related activity" and will include completing a project or spending time in a health care setting that will help you grow as a nursing professional. You will develop your goals and build an experience or project that will help you meet these individual goals. You will submit the plan for your health–related activity to your instructor for approval.

Examples of Appropriate Clinical Experiences

As you work closely with your adviser and your faculty to plan the path most appropriate for you, your individual clinical experience will be based on your own needs and goals. However, some possible clinical experiences to consider include:

  • Complete a quality improvement observation and project.
  • Create a teaching project for a vulnerable population.
  • Prepare a "Brown Bag Medication Health Teaching" program at a senior center.
  • Collaborate with an agency to identify, investigate, develop, implement, and evaluate a pilot evidence-based practice (EBP) project following a specific EBP model.
  • Develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive weight-management program, presented biweekly during the semester, with adults living in an assisted living apartment complex.
  • Collaborate with a school nurse to develop, implement, and evaluate a health education fair at a local school.
  • Develop a heart-healthy education program to be implemented in K–6 physical education classes in elementary schools.
  • Perform blood pressure screening and assessment of clients at a homeless shelter.
  • Follow an administrator of a nonprofit, for-profit, or public agency and develop an intervention or project based on what you have learned.
  • Work with case management at an insurance company.
  • Investigate allocation and/or utilization of health care resources in a geographical setting. Plan and implement a program based on this information.
  • Join and then lead a support group — review group dynamics and current research on topic.
  • Examine program planning at agencies — e.g., the Red Cross — and learn what is involved in planning for blood donation drives.
  • Gain clinical experience in a specialty area of your choice.

Contact Us

World Campus Admissions Counselors
Phone: 814-863-5386
Email: [email protected]

To learn more about the highly respected nursing programs, visit The Penn State Ross and Carol Nese College of Nursing website.

Faculty

  • Stephanie Barrett, RN, ONC

    • Degree
      MSN, University of Hartford
    • Degree
      BSN, University of Connecticut

    Stephanie Barrett instructs students in NURS 440: Trauma/Critical Care. An experienced critical care and trauma nurse, she is also a nurse educator in a large academic medical center.

  • Patricia Conroy, RN

    • Degree
      MSN, Bloomsburg University
    • Degree
      BSN, Alfred University
    • Degree
      Diploma in Nursing, Allentown Hospital School of Nursing

    Patricia Conroy is a clinical nurse specialist with more than 11 years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry, along with extensive broad-based clinical nursing experience. In addition to her experience teaching nursing students who are candidates for the bachelor's degree, she has expertise in grassroots advocacy development and coalition-building, with a background in managed care, disease management, development and refining of clinical guidelines, and outcomes assessment. She also has extensive experience in program development. She has received national recognition for her work in osteoporosis and postmenopausal women's health education.

  • Elizabeth Cutezo, CNE

    • Degree
      MSN, Penn State
    • Degree
      BSN, Penn State

    Elizabeth Cutezo, an assistant teaching professor in the Ross and Carol Nese College of Nursing at Penn State, has supervisory experience in nursing homes and work experience in the nursing areas of medical-surgical, intensive care, school nursing, and home health nursing. Her educational focus is on family and community, diversity, epidemiology, veteran care, disaster preparedness, and technology use in community settings and in simulation laboratories.

  • Michael Evans

    • Degree
      DNP, Penn State
    • Degree
      M.S. in Ed., Capella University
    • Degree
      MSN, Misericordia University
    • Degree
      BSN, Penn State
    • Degree
      A.S.N., Penn State

    Dr. Michael Evans, assistant dean of undergraduate nursing education at Penn State campuses and associate teaching professor of nursing, teaches in the BSN, RN to BSN, and graduate-level programs (DNP). His research interests center around palliative and end-of-life care and improving the quality of life for persons living with chronic progressive illnesses.

  • Lisa Firestine, RN

    • Degree
      MSN, Indiana University
    • Degree
      BSN, University of Michigan

    Lisa Firestine has been a nursing instructor with Penn State World Campus since 2008. Prior to joining World Campus, she taught in a traditional classroom at Penn State University Park, as well as at Purdue University. She has taught courses in medical-surgical nursing, health assessment, nursing ethics, informatics, nursing research, and leadership. She has also developed several electives in such areas as medical-surgical nursing, critical care nursing, and health assessment. Her thesis focused on the relationship between perceived threat, coping, and coping effectiveness of individuals with coronary artery disease. She has also published in the area of psychosocial issues in cardiac patients.

  • Abby Hackenberger, RN

    Degree
    MSN, Nursing Education, Penn State

    Abby Hackenberger has been a certified critical care RN for more than a decade, and this is where her passion lies.  She has taught clinically and in the hospital setting, all in critical care for the past several years.

  • M. Ellen Hollars

    • Degree
      MSN, Penn State
    • Degree
      BSN, Penn State

    M. Ellen Hollars provides instruction for Penn State World Campus nursing management certificate courses and independent study courses, teaches part-time as a clinical instructor for undergraduate nursing students, and serves as the COO of VNA Health System. Her research and practice interests include community health, home health and hospice, person-centered care, care collaboration, geriatric outcomes, and models of care delivery for home health. She has served community organizations in both a leadership and volunteer capacity, and she is passionate about teaching and helping new RNs and RNs pursuing their BSN degrees to be the best nurses that they can possibly be.

  • Suzanne Kuhn, RN, CNE

    • Degree
      DNP, Duquesne University
    • Degree
      MSN, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
    • Degree
      BSN, St. Francis University

    Dr. Suzanne Kuhn is the campus coordinator for nursing programs at Penn State Altoona. She has been a nurse educator for more than 25 years in a variety of areas, including pediatrics, medical-surgical nursing, fundamentals, professional role development, dying and death, and ethics. Her research interests include end-of life-issues, bereavement following the death of a child, health promotion and education, and companion animals.

  • Delores McCreary

    • Degree
      DNP, Penn State
    • Degree
      MSN, Penn State
    • Degree
      BSN, Penn State

    Dr. Delores McCreary is an associate teaching professor of nursing who has taught a wide array of nursing classes. Community health and leadership are her primary areas of expertise.

  • Nickolaus Miehl

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University
    • Degree
      Post-MSN Certificate, Nursing Education, Clarion University
    • Degree
      MSN, Forensic Nursing, Duquesne University
    • Degree
      BSN, Nursing, Gannon University

    Dr. Nickolaus Miehl teaches in the forensic nursing certificate program. His research interests include clinical leadership and innovation in complex health care delivery systems.

  • Melissa Miner, RN, CNE

    • Degree
      DNP, Waynesburg University
    • Degree
      MSN, Duquesne University
    • Degree
      BSN, Penn State

    Dr. Melissa Miner has taught nursing to students in the diploma, associate degree, RN to BSN, and BSN programs for nearly three decades. Her background in teaching and research primarily focuses on adult medical-surgical disorders. Dr. Miner also has teaching and research interests in evidence-based practice as it relates to research, health assessment, and community settings (i.e., hospice). She is interested in reading about new topics, such as genomics and transitional care as it relates to nursing practice.

  • Mary Alyce Nelson

    • Degree
      DNP, Penn State
    • Degree
      MSN, Bloomsburg University
    • Degree
      BSN, Villa Maria College

    Dr. Mary Alyce Nelson is the coordinator of the Penn State World Campus RN to BSN program and an assistant professor/undergraduate nursing coordinator at Penn State University Park. She has held various administrative roles in inpatient, outpatient, and educational settings, and her areas of expertise are mental health and health care leadership. Her research area of interest is alternative models of mental health treatment in rural outpatient clinics.

  • Janet Ritenour, RN

    Degree
    MSN, West Virginia University

    Janet Ritenour has focused on primary maternity nursing, and she is a certified hypnotherapist and aromatherapy practitioner. Her areas of expertise are women's health, alternative health, research, dying and death, and forensic nursing.

  • Joyce Taylor

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Education, Specialization Nursing Education, Capella University
    • Degree
      MSN, Nursing Education, Indiana Wesleyan University
    • Degree
      BSN, Penn State

    Dr. Joyce Taylor is an associate teaching professor in nursing. Her teaching and research involve academic progression in nursing education. She has more than 30 years of combined clinical and teaching experience in nursing, working in various health care institutions, with a primary focus in critical-care and trauma. Dr. Taylor teaches across the nursing curriculum in both online and face-to-face courses. She is involved in the RN to BSN program.

  • Brenda Terry-Manchester

    Degree
    MSN, Misericordia University

    Brenda Terry-Manchester's research interests include qualitative analysis and holistic perspectives of nurses. Her teaching experience includes a broad range of leadership/management topics as well as management of patients with complex/critical care needs.

  • Rebecca D. Toothaker

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Philosophy of Nursing, University of Phoenix
    • Degree
      MSN, Nursing Education, University of Phoenix
    • Degree
      BSN, Kutztown University
    • Degree
      Diploma, Nursing, Reading Hospital School of Nursing

    Dr. Rebecca D. Toothaker, adjunct faculty member of nursing, focuses her research on generational learners and success nursing education completion rates. She teaches courses in nursing, health assessment, and nursing research.

  • Beth Ann White, DNP, CRNP-BC, RN

    • Degree
      DNP, Penn State
    • Degree
      M.S. and Adult Nurse Practitioner, Penn State
    • Degree
      B.S., Nursing, Penn State
    • Degree
      RN, Diploma, Geisinger School of Nursing

    Dr. Beth Ann White is the coordinator for the FNP program and is an associate teaching professor in the College of Nursing. She has worked as a case manager, disease manager, and regional manager for the Medical Home project, along with her continued practice as an adult nurse practitioner. Her research interest includes improved oral care in long-term care.

News

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RN to BSN online learner named student marshal for Nese College of Nursing,

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