Marie Hojnacki

Ph.D., Political Science, Ohio State University
M.A., Political Science, Ohio State University
M.S., Public Policy Analysis, University of Rochester
B.A., Political Science and Communication, Canisius College 

Dr. Marie Hojnacki is an associate professor of political science at Penn State University Park. Her research examines how organized interests act to shape public policy, and why some types of interests have advantages over others in terms of policy success and agenda setting. A current project investigates how organizations communicate their issue priorities, and how and why communication strategies may differ for different types of groups. Dr. Hojnacki teaches about political parties, interest groups, representation, and research design.

Amy Linch

Ph.D., Political Science, Rutgers University
B.A., Political Science and Philosophy, Boston College

Dr. Amy Linch is an assistant professor of teaching and co-director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Political Science at Penn State University Park. She has authored and edited several works on democratization in postcommunist societies and social and political transformation in early modern England. Her recent work focuses on the intersection between human capabilities and the capabilities of other species.

Tamar London

Ph.D., Political Science, University of Rochester
B.A., Mathematics and Political Science, Binghamton University 

Dr. Tamar London is an instructor for Penn State World Campus. Her past research has focused on mathematical models of international negotiation. She teaches courses on international relations, international political economy, and game theory and statistics.

Mark Major

Ph.D., Political Science, Rutgers University
M.A., Public Policy and International Affairs, William Paterson University
B.A., Communication, Michigan State University 

Dr. Mark Major is an associate teaching professor in the Department of Political Science at Penn State University Park. His research and teaching interests include political communication, the American presidency, and American political development. Dr. Major is the author of The Unilateral Presidency and the News Media: The Politics of Framing Executive Power.

Nicole Morford

Ph.D., Political Science, Penn State
M.A., Political Science, Penn State
B.A., Political Science, Geneva College

Dr. Nicole Morford is an instructor for Penn State World Campus. Her research focused on social movements and civil society development in post-Soviet states, particularly the women's movement in Ukraine. She teaches courses about American and comparative politics.

Adam Nye

Ph.D., Political Science, University at Buffalo, SUNY
M.S., Social Sciences Interdisciplinary, University at Buffalo, SUNY
B.A., Political Science and Psychology, University at Buffalo, SUNY 

Dr. Adam Nye is an associate teaching professor in the Department of Political Science at Penn State’s University Park campus. He primarily teaches courses related to public law and judicial politics. The public law courses focus on landmark Supreme Court cases, while the courses related to judicial politics concentrate on legal procedures and the behavior of judges. In addition, Dr. Nye also teaches about the bureaucracy in America, and the American national government.

Amanda Parks

Ph.D., Political Science, Penn State
M.A., Political Science, Penn State
B.S., Journalism, Bowling Green State University

Dr. Amanda Parks, an instructor for Penn State World Campus, centers her research and teaching interests around public opinion and political communication, with a particular focus on the institutional reasons for media distortions and its effect on citizens' evaluations of policies and candidates. Other research interests include deliberative citizen engagement and the effects of new media on political communication.

Burcin Tamer

Ph.D., Political Science and Women's Studies (dual degree), Penn State
M.A., Political Science, Penn State
B.A., International Relations, Koç University
B.A., Business Administration, Koç University  

Dr. Burcin Tamer, an instructor for Penn State World Campus, uses quantitative and computational methods to answer social and political questions. She has extensive experience in multisource data collection and management, advanced statistical modeling, and data visualization. In her research she has examined such topics as economic development and the environment, science policies and education issues, and the politics of climate change. She teaches courses on comparative politics and political analysis.