golf turf course

Bachelor of Science in
Turfgrass Science

Program summary

Take your turf career to the next level. This online program's integrated curriculum can help you sharpen your skills in communications and business management as you build a strong foundation in contemporary turfgrass management.

Application deadline

Apply by March 15 to start May 13

Credits and costs

120 Credits $626/$671 per credit

Nationally Recognized

US News and World Report Bachelor's badge
Our bachelor's degrees are highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

Gain Skills to Maximize Your Turfgrass Career Potential

  • Successfully incorporate turfgrass cultural practices, including cultivation, pest management, and soil modification.

  • Produce, establish, and manage primary turfgrass species and cultivars.

  • Master turfgrass establishment and management, including mowing, fertilization, irrigation, and other cultural operations.

  • Devise methods of inquiry to distinguish cause and effect and to solve relevant problems in turfgrass management.

Study in a Variety of Online Courses

In addition to covering such topics as pesticides, turfgrass breeding, genetics, business management, and plant nutrition and fertility, this 120-credit program encompasses soil science and water quality course work.

The online Bachelor of Science in Turfgrass Science is a 120-credit (minimum) program of study that builds upon the advanced turfgrass management certificate. To earn this degree, you must successfully complete:

  • 49 prescribed course credits
  • 27 supporting course credits
  • 13 additional credits
  • 18 of the 45 credits for General Education are included in the requirements for the major
  • 1 elective credit

For help with understanding the credit distribution and requirements for program completion, contact an adviser today.

Required courses are supplemented by additional credits selected from a variety of areas to enhance your skills in related fields, such as business management, speech communications, and organic chemistry.

Supplemental courses in the program are available in a variety of formats. Details about each course's delivery method are available in LionPATH.

Prescribed Courses (49 Credits)

  • 3
    credits

    Development of quantitative problem-solving skills applied to specific examples of agribusiness management problems, using Excel spreadsheets.

    • Prerequisite

      AGBM 101

    • C or better

      A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to organic chemistry, with emphasis on the properties of organic compounds of biochemical importance. Because of duplication of subject matter, students may not receive credit for both CHEM 202 and CHEM 210.

    • Prerequisite

      CHEM 101 or CHEM 110, CHEM 110H or CHEM 106

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to entomology and management of insect pests of cold- and warm-season turfgrass.

    • Prerequisite Concurrent

      TURF 235

  • 3
    credits

    Quadratic equations; equation in quadratic form; word problems; graphing; algebraic fractions; negative and rational exponents; radicals.

    • Prerequisite

      MATH 4 or satisfactory performance on the mathematics placement examination.

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to biology of turfgrass pathogens and management of cool- and warm-season turfgrass.

    • Prerequisite

      TURF 235

  • 3
    credits

    A study of soil properties and processes and relationships to land use, plant growth, environmental quality, and society.

  • 4
    credits

    Descriptive Statistics, frequency distributions, probability and normal distributions, statistical inference, linear regression, and correlation.

    • Prerequisite

      Placement into MATH 21 or higher.

  • 1
    credit

    Covers chemical toxicity, formulations, environmental fate, labels, MSDS, calibration, IPM, safety, handling, storage, and Pennsylvania certification and regulations.

  • 3
    credits

    Characterization of the primary plant species used for sports, lawn and utility turf; includes turfgrass morphology, environmental adaptation, and cultural requirements.

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to the development of integrated weed management strategies utilizing a variety of cultural and chemical methods.

  • 3
    credits

    A study of irrigation topics with a strong concentration on turfgrass irrigation applications and a focus on surface and subsurface drainage.

    • Prerequisite

      TURF 235

    • Recommend preparation

      MATH 21 and SOILS 101

    • Note

      PLANT 217 may not be substituted for TURF 307 for prescribed course credit.

  • 3
    credits

    A study of turfgrass maintenance practices and how their interrelationships can be utilized to develop management systems.

    • Prerequisite

      TURF 235

    • Recommended preparation

      SOILS 101

  • 3
    credits

    Characterization of soil's physical and chemical properties for the establishment and maintenance of sports turf; includes root zone construction.

    • Prerequisite

      TURF 235

    • Recommend preparation

      SOILS 101

  • 4
    credits

    Study of turfgrass nutrition and growth; emphasizing constructed and mineral soil fertility, nutrient uptake and function, and fertilizer-use efficiency.

    • Prerequisite

      TURF 235

    • Recommended preparation

      SOILS 101

  • 3
    credits

    Case study and discussion considering integrated management of selected turfgrass sites; emphasis on problem analysis, principle application, and decision-making.

    • Prerequisite

      TURF 235 and (TURF 434 or TURF 435)

    • Recommended preparation

      TURF 238 and TURF 425

  • 1
    credit

    Oral presentations developed by students in consultation with the course instructor

    • Prerequisite

      TURF 495

    • Note

      Seventh-semester standing

    • Note

      Prerequisites may be waived by the course instructor if student demonstrates required level of competency.

  • 3
    credits

    Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.

    • Prerequisite

      Prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor

Additional Courses (16 credits)

  • 4
    credits

    A study of the fundamental concepts of biology, including the evolution of the major groups of organisms. This is the first biology course taken by students who intend to major in biology. It provides a foundation in the basic concepts that govern life, including the evolutionary processes that have led to the biodiversity seen today.

    • 4
      credits

      Cellular structure, organization, and metabolism; plant anatomy and physiological processes; plant reproduction and development; genetics and evolution; relationships and features of plant groups. Students who have passed BIOL 240W may not schedule this course.

    • or:
      4
      credits

      Introduction to horticulture with an emphasis on plant domestication, morphology, classification, world food crops, commodities, gardens, propagation, and agrochemicals. The course content deals with the fundamental concepts and specialty areas, which contribute not only to the science and technology involved in horticulture but also to the art.

    • 3
      credits

      Writing for students in scientific and technical disciplines.

      • Prerequisite

        ENGL 15, ESL 15, ENGL 30, and 4th Semester standing OR ENGL 137H, ENGL 138T, and 4th Semester standing

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Writing reports and other common forms of business communication.

      • Prerequisite

        (ENGL 15 or ESL 15 or ENGL 30) and 4th-semester standing OR (ENGL 137H and ENGL 138T) and 4th-semester standing

    • 3
      credits

      Nontechnical treatment of fundamentals of modern meteorology and the effects of weather and climate.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Fundamental principles of synoptic and physical meteorology, satellite and radar imagery, and data analysis in the setting of mid-latitude weather forecasting.

    • 3
      credits

      First semester of a two-semester, comprehensive general chemistry course that introduces students to the basic principles of chemistry with an emphasis on the relationships between the microscopic structure and the macroscopic properties of matter.

      • Prerequisite

        Completion of or placement beyond MATH 22

      • C or better

        A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      This course is a one-semester rigorous college-level introductory Chemistry course covering the fundamental principles of general, organic, and biochemistry. One year of high school chemistry is strongly recommended.

      • Prerequisite

        Completion or placement beyond MATH 21

      • C or better

        A student enrolled in this course must receive a grade of C or better.

Supporting Courses (select 27 credits)

Select credits from each of the two categories under supporting courses to fulfill the requirements: 

  • 15 credits in Professional Management and Economics
  • 12 credits in Professional Agriculture

Electives (select 4 credits)

Elective courses will be chosen in consultation with your adviser.

Note: Listed prerequisites may be waived by the course instructor if you can demonstrate the required level of competency.

General Education Requirements

Some General Education requirements may be satisfied by courses required for the major. Students should work with an adviser to select courses.

  • Foundations: 15 credits  
    All courses require a grade of C or better. Inter-Domain courses may not be used for foundations requirements. 
    • Writing/Speaking: 9 credits 
    • Quantification: 6 credits 
      3-6 credits are selected from mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics; 3 credits may be selected from computer science or symbolic logic. 
  • Knowledge Domains: 15 credits  
    Inter-Domain courses may not be used for knowledge domain requirements.
    • Health and Wellness (GHW): 3 credits 
    • Natural Sciences (GN): 3 credits 
    • Arts (GA): 3 credits 
    • Humanities (GH): 3 credits 
    • Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS): 3 credits  
  • Integrative Studies: 6 credits
    • Inter-Domain course work: 6 credits  
  • Exploration: 9 credits 
    • Natural Sciences (GN) (may be Inter-Domain): 3 credits
    • GA, GH, GN, GS, and Inter-Domain courses: 6 credits  
      May include 3 credits of World Language course work beyond the requirements of the student’s degree program or at the 12th credit level, whichever is higher.

These General Education Requirements are for students who started in summer 2023 or later. Students who started earlier can review the prior version of the general education requirements

Course Availability

If you're ready to see when your courses will be offered, visit our public LionPATH course search (opens in new window) to start planning ahead.

Broaden Your Career Options

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You can use the knowledge gained from this program and the support of Penn State career resources to pursue careers in a variety of fields, depending on your goals.


Job Titles Related to This Degree

The B.S. in Turfgrass Science program can prepare golf course and sports field professionals for a variety of positions, including:

  • Golf Course Manager
  • Golf Course Superintendent
  • Grounds Maintenance Supervisor
  • Grounds Manager
  • Groundskeeper Supervisor

Employment Outlook for Occupational Fields Related to This Degree

Estimates of employment growth and total employment are provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and are subject to change. While these occupations are often pursued by graduates with this degree, individual outcomes may vary depending on a variety of factors. Penn State World Campus cannot guarantee employment in a given occupation.

First-Line Supervisors of Landscaping, Lawn Service, and Groundskeeping Workers

3.3%
employment growth (10 years)
122,910
total employment

Career Services to Set You Up for Success

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From the day you're accepted as a student, you can access resources and tools provided by Penn State World Campus Career Services to further your career. These resources are beneficial whether you're searching for a job or advancing in an established career.

  • Opportunities to connect with employers
  • Career counselor/coach support
  • Occupation and salary information
  • Internships
  • Graduate school resources 

Ready to Learn More?

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Ready to take the next step toward your Penn State bachelor's degree?

Apply by March 15 to start May 13. How to Apply

Costs and Financial Aid

Learn about this program's tuition, fees, scholarship opportunities, grants, payment options, and military benefits.

Costs and Financial Aid

Undergraduate Tuition

Undergraduate tuition is calculated based on the number of credits for which you register and the number of total credits you have accrued at or transferred to Penn State.

Tuition is due shortly after each semester begins and rates are assessed every semester of enrollment.

2023–24 Academic Year Rates

Tuition rates for the fall 2023, spring 2024, and summer 2024 semesters.

How many credits do you plan to take per semester? If you have 59 or fewer credits If you have 60 or more credits
11 or fewer $626 per credit $671 per credit
12–19 $7,602 per semester $8,206 per semester

Undergraduate students taking more than 19 credits will be charged the flat tuition rate plus the regular per credit hour rate for each credit above 19. 

2024–25 Academic Year Rates

Tuition rates for the fall 2024, spring 2025, and summer 2025 semesters.

How many credits do you plan to take per semester? If you have 59 or fewer credits If you have 60 or more credits
11 or fewer $632 per credit $678 per credit
12–19 $7,678 per semester $8,288 per semester

Undergraduate students taking more than 19 credits will be charged the flat tuition rate plus the regular per credit hour rate for each credit above 19. 

Financial Aid and Military Benefits

Some students may qualify for financial aid. Take the time to research financial aid, scholarships, and payment options as you prepare to apply. Military service members, veterans, and their spouses or dependents should explore these potential military education benefits and financial aid opportunities, as well.

Earn a Valuable Credential along the Way

A figure walking on a path that includes a certificate part of the way through their progress

Show mastery of specific subjects before your degree is complete. Thanks to shared courses across programs, students can often earn a certificate along with their degree in less time than if they earned them separately.

Certificate Programs Related to This Degree

The following certificates can be earned while completing this degree program:

Learn to plan and implement projects, communicate effectively, conduct training programs, and manage finances in this online degree program designed for those interested in or already working in the turf industry.

Learn more about the Associate in Science in Turfgrass Science and Management  

Build upon your existing skills and explore more advanced turfgrass topics, such as pest management, turfgrass cultural systems, turfgrass edaphology, and case studies in turfgrass management with this certificate.

Learn more about the Undergraduate Certificate in Turfgrass Management, Advanced  

A Legacy in Turfgrass Education

Penn State launched one of the first turfgrass programs in 1929. As the first university to offer a two-year program for golf course superintendents, and the first to offer a major in turfgrass science, we built a solid foundation for the turfgrass management programs offered through World Campus.

Who Should Apply?

If you have an interest in the turf industry, the bachelor's degree in turfgrass science — taken independently or as a follow-up to the advanced certificate or the associate degree — can give you the skills and advantage you need to move ahead.

Set Your Own Pace

Adult student doing course work online while a child plays nearby

Whether you are looking to finish your program as quickly as possible or balance your studies with your busy life, Penn State World Campus can help you achieve your education goals. Many students take one or two courses per semester.

Our online courses typically follow a 12- to 15-week semester cycle, and there are three semesters per year (spring, summer, and fall). If you plan to take a heavy course load, you should expect your course work to be your primary focus and discuss your schedule with your academic adviser. 

To Finish Your Degree in Two to Three Years

  • Take 6 courses each semester

To Finish Your Degree in Three to Four Years

  • Take 4–5 courses each semester 

To Finish Your Degree in Five or More Years

  • Take 2–3 courses each semester

Convenient Online Format

This program's convenient online format gives you the flexibility you need to study around your busy schedule. You can skip the lengthy commute without sacrificing the quality of your education and prepare yourself for more rewarding career opportunities without leaving your home.

A Trusted Leader in Online Education

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Penn State has a history of more than 100 years of distance education, and World Campus has been a leader in online learning for more than two decades. Our online learning environment offers the same quality education that our students experience on campus.

How to Apply to Penn State

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Apply by March 15 to start May 13

Application Instructions

Deadlines and Important Dates

Complete your application and submit all required materials by the appropriate deadline. Your deadline will depend on the semester you plan to start your courses.

  • Summer Deadline

    Apply by March 15 to start May 13
  • Fall Deadline

    Apply by June 30 to start August 26
  • Spring Deadline

    Apply by October 31, 2024, to start January 13, 2025

New students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA by March 1. Please visit the Office of Student Aid website for more information about applying for financial aid and recommended deadlines.

Steps to Apply

  1. To apply for this program, you must be a high school graduate, or have completed your GED.

  2. You will need the following items to complete your application:

    High school transcripts or GED transcript — First-year applicants are required to submit Self-Reported Academic Records (SRAR) when applying. Official high school transcripts for first-year applicants will only be required at the time a student accepts an offer of admission to Penn State.

    Transfer international students will need to submit their high school transcript before their application can be reviewed.

    Official college or university transcripts and/or official military transcripts (if applicable) — All college or university transcripts are required regardless of the length of time that has passed, the grades earned, or the accreditation of the institutions attended. Acceptance of transfer credit toward your degree is subject to final approval by the academic department. For detailed information, see the Transfer Students page.

    Transcripts not in English must be accompanied by a certified translation.

    English Proficiency — The language of instruction at Penn State is English. With some exceptions, international applicants must take and submit scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Minimum test scores and exceptions are found in the English Language Proficiency section on the Undergraduate Admissions International Requirements page. Visit the TOEFL website for testing information. Penn State's institutional code is 2660.

  3. To begin the online application, you will need a Penn State account.

    Create a New Penn State Account

    If you have any problems during this process, contact an admissions counselor at [email protected].

    Please note: Former Penn State students may not need to complete the admissions application or create a new Penn State account. Please visit our Returning Students page for instructions.

  4. Accessing MyPennState

    The MyPennState Portal provides access to our online admissions services. Before accessing MyPennState, you must have a Penn State account that will be used to access all Penn State systems. After creating an account, you will receive a unique Penn State User ID. You will need to enter your User ID followed by @psu.edu when signing in to MyPennState and other Penn State sites. For example, you should be entering something like '[email protected]' in the Sign In field.

    The application consists of six sections:

    1. Application Setup
    2. Program of Study
    3. Citizenship and Residency
    4. Academics and Experience
    5. Miscellaneous
    6. Review and Submit
    Application Setup
    • Be sure to select "Online" for the "How would you like to complete your degree" question if you plan to attend Penn State World Campus.

    • The rest of this section will ask some basic questions about your education experience and military affiliation.

    Program of Study
    • You will choose the degree type and then the starting semester.

    • Your starting campus will be selected as Penn State World Campus by default as long as you picked "Online" in your Application Setup. Click Continue.

    • On the Choose a Program page, select your intended major from the list.

    • Review your selection on the summary screen and click Continue to move on to the Citizenship and Residency section.

    Citizenship and Residency
    • Complete the series of questions about your citizenship status, demographic information, Pennsylvania residency status, and family history.

    Academics and Experience
    • You will need to enter academic experience information about your high school and any attempted courses at a college or university after high school.

    • The Education Gap Statement offers a place to explain any time that has elapsed between your high school graduation and your anticipated enrollment at Penn State. Please provide a summary of why that gap occurred. Some examples that would explain a gap in your education include work, family, attending another college or university, etc.

    Miscellaneous
    • In the Miscellaneous section, you will provide any program-specific requirements (e.g., a personal statement), information about activities, and financial aid information.

    Review and Submit

    Review your information, digitally sign your application, and provide payment for the application fee ($65 domestic or $75 international).

    High School Transcripts and Academic Record
    • After your application is completed, you will also need to self-report your high school course work before the application deadline. You will be directed to fill out the Self-Reported Academic Record (SRAR). It is helpful to have a high school transcript available when completing this section. In the third section, you'll select your program of study and campus.

    • Official high school transcripts or GED transcript, along with records from high school, are required, regardless of the length of time that has passed.

    • Include any college/university transcripts (required), military transcripts, and Proof of English Language proficiency (if applicable). SAT/ACT scores are not required if you are identified as an adult learner or transfer student.

    All official documents should be sent to: 

    Undergraduate Admissions Office
    The Pennsylvania State University
    201 Shields Building
    University Park, PA 16802

    You can also have your transcripts sent electronically through Parchment, eScript-Safe, or the National Clearinghouse directly to Penn State from the college/university where course work was attempted.

    Acceptance

    After receiving your application, application fee, and all required materials, your application will be evaluated for admission. You can check your application status online. This will provide the most up‐to‐date information about the status of your application and is updated once daily, before 8:00 a.m. (ET). Once a decision has been made regarding your application, it will be available to you through the MyPennState portal.

    For information on when you can expect an admissions decision, visit the Dates and Deadlines page of the Undergraduate Admissions website. Make sure you click the "+" sign to see these dates for World Campus Applicants (First-Year and Transfer).

  5. 5. Complete the application.

Admissions Help

If you have questions about the admissions process, contact an admissions counselor at [email protected].

Contact Us

Customer service representative wearing a headset

Have questions or want more information? We're happy to talk.

To learn more about the Bachelor of Science in Turfgrass Science, please contact:

World Campus Admissions Counselors
Phone: 814-863-5386
[email protected]

Learn from the Best

Penn State's turfgrass science program is widely regarded as the foremost program of its kind in the world. The B.S. degree in turfgrass science was developed and is taught by faculty from the Plant Science, Entomology, and Plant Pathology departments in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Faculty

  • Jeff Borger

    • Degree
      M.S., Agronomy, Penn State
    • Degree
      B.S., Turfgrass Science, Penn State

    Jeff Borger, assistant teaching professor of turfgrass weed management, has been with Penn State for more than 25 years. He oversees a turfgrass field research program that encompasses the evaluations of grassy and broadleaf weed control and plant growth regulators. He teaches numerous courses in both the resident and Penn State World Campus four-year and two-year turfgrass programs.

  • Michael Fidanza

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Agronomy, University of Maryland
    • Degree
      M.S., Agronomy, Penn State
    • Degree
      B.S., Agricultural Science, Penn State

    Dr. Michael Fidanza is a professor of plant and soil sciences at Penn State Berks. His research and teaching focuses are turfgrass ecology, the translational evaluation and exploration of plant health products (fungicides, herbicides, and plant growth regulators), soil surfactants, seed technology, bio stimulants, turfgrass physiology, cultural practices in turfgrass ecosystems, and the biology and ecology of fairy ring disease in turf. He is the director of Penn State's Center for the Agricultural Sciences and a Sustainable Environment, and he is a Fellow in the American Society of Agronomy.

  • David Huff

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Genetics, University of California, Davis
    • Degree
      M.S., Genetics, University of California, Davis
    • Degree
      B.S., Crop and Soils Sciences, Michigan State University

    Dr. David Huff is a research scientist who performs basic and applied genetics on a wide range of grass species, including some native to North America. In the area of crop improvement, his program focuses on enhancing turf quality, seed yield, persistence, disease resistance, and tolerance to salinity and extreme temperatures (both heat and cold). He also performs a range of genomic investigations on the reproductive biology of these grasses, including such systems as apomixis, dioecy, and fungal-induced hermaphroditism.

  • Brad Jakubowski

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Agronomy, Penn State, in progress
    • Degree
      M.S., Soil Science, Colorado State University
    • Degree
      B.S., Comprehensive Environmental Geography, University of Nebraska
    • Degree
      A.A.S., Printing Technology and Industry, Central Community College

    Brad Jakubowski is an instructor of golf course irrigation and drainage, landscape irrigation and water management, and turfgrass management. He is experienced in water management, irrigation management, turfgrass management, and soil. As a Ph.D. candidate, he is studying impact attenuation on natural and synthetic athletic turfgrass fields.

  • Peter Landschoot

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Plant Pathology, University of Rhode Island
    • Degree
      M.S., Agronomy, Penn State
    • Degree
      B.S., Agronomy, Penn State

    Dr. Peter Landschoot's primary job responsibility involves turfgrass extension and outreach in Pennsylvania. His research interests include disease and weed management, soil improvement, turfgrass variety evaluation, and soil fertility. Dr. Landschoot teaches Case Studies in Turfgrass Management in the resident and World Campus programs at Penn State.

  • Benjamin McGraw

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Entomology, Rutgers University
    • Degree
      M.S., Entomology, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    • Degree
      B.S., Animal Science, University of Maine

    Dr. Benjamin McGraw's main teaching foci at Penn State are general turfgrass management (TURF 235, 496a) and entomology courses (ENT 317, 952a). His research program focuses on understanding the biology and ecology of turfgrass insect populations to improve current management practices and develop novel, more sustainable management and monitoring programs. 

  • Andrew McNitt

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Soil Science, Penn State
    • Degree
      M.S., Agronomy, Penn State
    • Degree
      B.S., Horticulture, Penn State

    Dr. Andrew McNitt is the director of Penn State's Center for Sports Surface Research, where he conducts research relating to athletic field surface characterization and golf green construction and maintenance. As the technical adviser to the NFL Groundskeepers Organization, he oversees the NFL field certification and serves on several committees at the League level.

  • Max Schlossberg

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Agronomy, University of Georgia
    • Degree
      M.S., Agronomy, University of Georgia
    • Degree
      B.S., Agronomy, Texas A&M University

    Dr. Max Schlossberg's comprehensive instructional approach supports effective management of turfgrass in every hemisphere. His primary research focuses on developing fertilizer programs to optimize resilience, playability, and nutrient use efficiency of turfgrass systems. His laboratory team has identified cultural methods for rapid soil pH optimization of turfgrass root zones, enhanced efficiency mechanisms of N fertilizers, factors controlling soil water repellency development, and topographic dependence of soils fertility.

News


Ready to take the next step toward your Penn State bachelor's degree?

Apply by March 15 to start May 13. How to Apply