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Master of Education inCurriculum and Instruction

Program summary

Advance your knowledge of curriculum, teaching, learning, teacher education, and educational supervision. Join a vibrant community of educators and take the next step in your education in this customizable program that allows you to shape your learning by choosing from a wide variety of courses.

100% Online

Complete your Penn State course work at your own pace and 100% online.

Application deadline

This deadline has been extended .Apply by April 15 to start May 13

Credits and costs

30 Credits$1,017 per credit

Nationally Recognized

US News and World Report graduate education C&I badge
Our graduate education Curriculum and Instruction program is highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

Enhance Your Career in Education

  • Understand and address evolving challenges facing education through a focused plan you create by selecting courses that fit your goals.

  • Position yourself to provide curriculum leadership in educational settings.

  • Cultivate an inquiry stance to evaluate your own practice and then make responsive adjustments that benefit the learners under your instruction.

  • Develop expertise in educational technologies used for curriculum design and delivery.

Course Work That’s Applicable to Your Career

Your master’s degree curriculum will be personalized to reflect your professional goals and personal interests. Whether you seek depth in a single discipline or choose an interdisciplinary approach, your adviser will help you create a truly customized plan of study with course work that makes sense for you.

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Curriculum and Instruction is a 30-credit degree. All courses and electives in the program are at the graduate level (400, 500, 800). A culminating inquiry project (paper, portfolio, children’s book, etc.) is required for successful completion of the degree. You will negotiate the project’s focus, scope, and methods with your faculty adviser and be mentored throughout the process.

The program is structured around these requirements:

  • 3-credit core colloquium
  • 9 credits of core courses
  • 15 credits with a personalized focus
  • 3 credits of additional approved electives

Core Colloquium (3 credits)

  • 3
    credits

    Introduction to colleagues and program with attention to themes of inquiry, evidence, and assessment. (C I 590 should be the first course in a student's program.)

Core Courses (select 9 credits)

    • 3
      credits

      Current school programs and options and their impact on pupils; problems in introducing new content into the curriculum.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      The analysis and use of the foundations which underlie models of curriculum design.

    • 3
      credits

      This course covers the major theories used to explain learning across educational settings.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      The study of childhood from cultural, historical, psychological, and philosophical perspectives.

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Exploration of the theoretical and empirical foundations of the teaching and learning of science.

      • Note

        Students on the Children's Literature path do not have the option to select this as a Core Course.

    • 3
      credits

      Course guides teachers to develop systematic inquires into effective teaching and learning. CI 501 should be taken the third to last semester before graduation.

      • Note

        CI 501 should be taken the third to last semester before graduation

    • or:
      3
      credits

      Addresses the different research approaches for doing research in children's literature. Specifically, it discusses research methods and topics in a wide range of theoretical and practical fields — including psychoanalysis, literacies, genre studies, critical pedagogies, biographical studies, critical race theory, and reader responses — guiding learners on how to conduct original research around any topic of choice. It also addresses research methods for doing research on creative writing.

      • Note

        Students in the Children's Literature path will take this core course instead of CI 501

      • Timing

        This course should be taken near the end of your program, but not as your last course

Children's Literature

  • 3
    credits

    An in-depth study of picturebooks as art objects providing aesthetic experiences and contributing to our aesthetic development in literacy education.

  • 3
    credits

    A study of nonfiction literature for children and adolescents with an emphasis on inspiring curiosity and agency.

  • 3
    credits

    Examine work by writers of classic fantasies (H. C. Andersen, A. A. Milne, etc.) written for children, as well as the work of some contemporary authors (J. K. Rowling, Philip Pullman, Tomi Adeyemi, Nnedi Okorafor, etc.) and popular comics. We will also look at the role of the imagination in the lives of children and the important ways children may transform their private spaces into spaces of wonder that allow them to flourish and reimagine their possibilities.

  • 3
    credits

    Study of various genres of children's literature, from various critical perspectives. Emphasis on role of literature in children's lives.

  • 3
    credits

    Critical study of adolescent literature, its diversity of cultural voices, and designs for its use in secondary school classrooms.

  • 3
    credits

    Read, discuss, analyze, and reflect on diverse literature from multicultural and critical multicultural perspectives to demonstrate how such ways of readings not only expand literacies but center issues of social justice.

  • 3
    credits

    An in-depth study of myths and folktales shared with children and how these stories are remade across different modes and disseminated today across multiple communities of practices.

  • 3
    credits

    Supervised workshop in the craft and techniques of writing picture books, short stories, longer fiction, and nonfiction literature for children.

Curriculum and Supervision 

  • 3
    credits

    Managing and coping with disruptive student behavior in instructional settings so that they support the teaching/learning process.

  • 3
    credits

    This course focuses on practice-embedded curriculum inquiry and surveys an array of approaches and methods that are quantitative, qualitative, or both.

  • 3
    credits

    The analysis and use of the foundations which underlie models of curriculum design.

  • 3
    credits

    Social and institutional settings for instructional supervision; functions, activities, and practices of supervision; supervisory case studies.

  • 3
    credits

    Strategies and techniques for supervision/coaching of instruction intended to enhance teacher reflection, self-direction, and autonomy.

  • 3
    credits

    Designing, implementing, and evaluating effective staff development programs for personnel in educational settings.

Elementary Education

  • 3
    credits

    Managing and coping with disruptive student behavior in instructional settings so that they support the teaching/learning process.

  • 3
    credits

    A study of nonfiction literature for children and adolescents with an emphasis on inspiring curiosity and agency.

  • 3
    credits

    Read, discuss, analyze, and reflect on diverse literature from multicultural and critical multicultural perspectives to demonstrate how such ways of readings not only expand literacies but center issues of social justice.

  • 3
    credits

    Develop abilities in planning, conducting, and interpreting mathematics interviews to gain an understanding of students' thinking processes and current knowledge.

  • 3
    credits

    This course develops understandings of research and practices around issues in PreK–12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education.

  • 3
    credits

    This course develops understandings of research and practices around issues in PreK–12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education.

  • 3
    credits

    Critical understanding of basic concepts and principles in second language acquisition and teaching. Teaching of world languages, including English as a second language.

English Language Arts, World Languages/ESL, or Social Studies

  • 3
    credits

    A study of nonfiction literature for children and adolescents with an emphasis on inspiring curiosity and agency.

  • 3
    credits

    In depth examination of writing development and the development of writing components of language arts programs K–12.

  • 3
    credits

    Critical study of adolescent literature, its diversity of cultural voices, and designs for its use in secondary school classrooms.

  • 3
    credits

    Read, discuss, analyze, and reflect on diverse literature from multicultural and critical multicultural perspectives to demonstrate how such ways of readings not only expand literacies but center issues of social justice.

  • 3
    credits

    Theories of media literacy, issues of non-print technology in language and literacy.

  • 3
    credits

    This course examines the educational uses, tensions, and implications of historically oriented media for teaching and learning historical literacy, focusing on adolescent and teenage learners in the context of K–12 schooling.

  • 3
    credits

    Critical understanding of basic concepts and principles in second language acquisition and teaching. Teaching of world languages, including English as a second language.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

  • 3
    credits

    This course develops understandings of research and practices around issues in PreK–12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education.

  • 3
    credits

    This course develops understandings of research and practices around issues in PreK–12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education.

  • 3
    credits

    Develop abilities in planning, conducting, and interpreting mathematics interviews to gain an understanding of students' thinking processes and current knowledge.

  • 3
    credits

    Survey of the status of knowledge about mathematics learning and instruction, K–12; analysis of research procedures; instruments for evaluating research.

  • 3
    credits

    Exploration of the theoretical and empirical foundations of the teaching and learning of science.

  • 3
    credits

    This course is intended to help experienced educators to critically understand the "E" in "STEM education.

Course Availability

If you're ready to see when your courses will be offered, visit our public LionPATH course search (opens in new window) to start planning ahead.

Advance Your Career

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You can use the knowledge gained from this program and the support of Penn State career resources to pursue careers in a variety of fields, depending on your goals.


Job Titles Related to This Degree

The following roles are often held by people with this type of degree:

  • Curriculum and Instruction Director
  • Curriculum Coordinator
  • Curriculum Director
  • Educator
  • Teacher

Employment Outlook for Occupational Fields Related to This Degree

Estimates of employment growth and total employment are provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and are subject to change. While these occupations are often pursued by graduates with this degree, individual outcomes may vary depending on a variety of factors. Penn State World Campus cannot guarantee employment in a given occupation.

Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education

1%
employment growth (10 years)
1,042,090
total employment

Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education

0.7%
employment growth (10 years)
1,394,200
total employment

Instructional Coordinators

2.5%
employment growth (10 years)
198,660
total employment

Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education

0.8%
employment growth (10 years)
611,120
total employment

Career Services to Set You Up for Success

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From the day you're accepted as a student, you can access resources and tools provided by Penn State World Campus Career Services to further your career. These resources are beneficial whether you're searching for a job or advancing in an established career.

  • Opportunities to connect with employers
  • Career counselor/coach support
  • Occupation and salary information
  • Internships
  • Graduate school resources 

Ready to Learn More?

Get the resources you need to make informed decisions about your education. Request information on this program and other programs of interest by completing this form.

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Learn more about this program

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Ready to take the next step toward your Penn State master's degree?

Apply by April 15 to start May 13. How to Apply 

Costs and Financial Aid

Learn about this program's tuition, fees, scholarship opportunities, grants, payment options, and military benefits.

Costs and Financial Aid

Graduate Tuition

Graduate tuition is calculated based on the number of credits for which you register. Tuition is due shortly after each semester begins and rates are assessed every semester of enrollment.

2023–24 Academic Year Rates

Tuition rates for the fall 2023, spring 2024, and summer 2024 semesters.

How many credits do you plan to take per semester?Cost
11 or fewer$1,017 per credit
12 or more$12,203 per semester

2024–25 Academic Year Rates

Tuition rates for the fall 2024, spring 2025, and summer 2025 semesters.

How many credits do you plan to take per semester?Cost
11 or fewer$1,027 per credit
12 or more$12,325 per semester

Financial Aid and Military Benefits

Some students may qualify for financial aid. Take the time to research financial aid, scholarships, and payment options as you prepare to apply. Military service members, veterans, and their spouses or dependents should explore these potential military education benefits and financial aid opportunities, as well.

To view the detailed list of cost of attendance elements, select “World Campus” as the location on the tuition site.

Designed for Educators

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction is designed for teachers as well as a wide range of education professionals, including curriculum specialists, paraprofessionals, librarians, out-of-school educators, and more. It provides professional learning opportunities that are informed by the latest research and can be immediately applicable in your current role.

*Please note that this is a master's degree program. It is not designed to lead to initial teacher certification in any state. However, it may help you renew or maintain your existing certification if you are already a certified teacher. Please check with your state's Department of Education for renewal and maintenance requirements.

Earn a Valuable Credential along the Way

A figure walking on a path that includes a certificate part of the way through their progress

This online education master’s degree program is part of a portfolio that includes additional graduate certificates and endorsements (12 credit hours each). Students in the program can earn a graduate certificate as part of completing their master’s degree.

Certificate Programs Related to This Degree

The following certificate can be earned while completing this degree program:

Explore classic and contemporary works of children’s literature as you learn about imagination and its role in the lives of children. This online program is ideal for educators and librarians, as well as aspiring children's writers and illustrators yearning to refine their craft.

Learn more about the Graduate Certificate in Children's Literature

Set Your Own Pace

Adult student doing course work online while a child plays nearby

Whether you are looking to finish your program as quickly as possible or balance your studies with your busy life, Penn State World Campus can help you achieve your education goals. Many students take one or two courses per semester.

Our online courses typically follow a 12- to 15-week semester cycle, and there are three semesters per year (spring, summer, and fall). If you plan to take a heavy course load, you should expect your course work to be your primary focus and discuss your schedule with your academic adviser. 

To Finish Your Degree in One to Two Years

  • Take 3–4 courses each semester

To Finish Your Degree in Two to Three Years

  • Take 2–3 courses each semester 

To Finish Your Degree in Three to Four Years

  • Take 1 course each semester

Convenient Online Format

This program's convenient online format gives you the flexibility you need to study around your busy schedule. You can skip the lengthy commute without sacrificing the quality of your education and prepare yourself for more rewarding career opportunities without leaving your home.

A Trusted Leader in Online Education

Penn State students wearing caps and gowns at their commencement ceremony

Penn State has a history of more than 100 years of distance education, and World Campus has been a leader in online learning for more than two decades. Our online learning environment offers the same quality education that our students experience on campus.

Professional Licensure / Certification

Disclosures

Many U.S. states and territories require professional licensure/certification to be employed. If you plan to pursue employment in a licensed profession after completing this program, please visit the Professional Licensure/Certification Disclosures by State interactive map for more information.

Please note that this master's degree program is not designed to lead to initial teacher certification in any state; however, it may help you renew or maintain your existing certification if you are already a certified teacher. Please check with your state's Department of Education for initial licensure requirements and renewal and maintenance requirements.

How to Apply to Penn State

A new student holding a sign that reads, We Are Penn State and #PennStateBound

Apply by April 15 to start May 13

Application Instructions

Deadlines and Important Dates

Complete your application and submit all required materials by the appropriate deadline. Your deadline will depend on the semester you plan to start your courses.

  • Summer Deadline

    Apply by April 15 to start May 13
  • Fall Deadline

    Apply by July 1 to start August 26
  • Spring Deadline

    Apply by October 1 to start January 13

Steps to Apply

  1. For admission to the Graduate School, an applicant must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates.

    GPA — All applicants are expected to have earned a junior/senior grade point average of 3.0 or higher.

  2. You will need to upload the following items as part of your application:

    Official transcripts from each institution attended, regardless of the number of credits or semesters completed. Transcripts not in English must be accompanied by a certified translation. Penn State alumni do not need to request transcripts for credits earned at Penn State, but must list Penn State as part of your academic history. If you are admitted, you will be asked to send an additional official transcript. You will receive instructions at that time.

    Test Scores — No GRE/GMAT scores are required.

    English Proficiency — The language of instruction at Penn State is English. With some exceptions, international applicants must take and submit scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Minimum test scores and exceptions are found in the English Proficiency section on the Graduate School's "Requirements for Graduate Admission" page. Visit the TOEFL website for testing information. Penn State's institutional code is 2660.

    References (2) — You will need to initiate the process through the online application by entering names, email addresses, and mailing addresses of two references. Upon submission of your application, an email will be sent to each reference requesting they complete a brief online recommendation regarding your commitment for success in an online program. Please inform all recommenders they must submit the form in order for your application to be complete.  

    Program-Specific Questions/Materials

    Résumé — Upload to the online application.

    Statement of Purpose — Please tell us why you would like to pursue graduate studies at Penn State. You may wish to tell us about questions or issues that drive you, experiences that have shaped your professional interests, your medium-term and long-term goals, and why you think that Penn State is well suited to help you. Feel free to include any additional information that may assist faculty in evaluating your preparation and aptitude for graduate study at Penn State.

    Writing Sample — Please attach a critical review of a research article or report from a recent educational journal in your area of proposed study. Identify the problem or issue, the author's analytical/empirical approach, and the nature of the evidence used in supporting any conclusions. Also, please offer your individual perspective on the importance of the research problem, the nature of the inquiry, and the legitimacy of the conclusions. At the top of the review, include a citation with the author's name, article title, journal name, volume, page numbers, and publication date. We’re looking for an essay of approximately 1000 words.

  3. To begin the online application, you will need a Penn State account.

    Create a New Penn State Account

    If you have any problems during this process, contact an admissions counselor at [email protected].

    Please note: Former Penn State students may not need to complete the admissions application or create a new Penn State account. Please visit our Returning Students page for instructions.

  4. You can begin your online application at any time. Your progress within the online application system will be saved as you go, allowing you to return at any point as you gather additional information and required materials.

    • Choose Enrollment Type: "Degree Admission"
    • Choose "WORLD CAMPUS" as the campus

    Checking Your Status 
    You can check the status of your application by using the same login information established for the online application form. 

    Technical Requirements  
    Review the technical requirements for this degree program. 

    Applying As a Nondegree Graduate Student

    Apply as a "nondegree" graduate student to begin taking courses right away. If you are taking courses as a nondegree graduate student, you must apply to the master's degree in your first semester of study to be considered for admission into the Curriculum and Instruction Master of Education. Penn State limits the number of nondegree credits that can be transferred into degree programs, even when those credits are earned at Penn State. Also, if you are admitted, you’ll be assigned a faculty adviser who will help ensure that you take the most appropriate courses for your specific interests and goals. In the graduate school application:

    • Select "Nondegree Admission"
    • Choose "WORLD CAMPUS" as the campus
  5. 5. Complete the application.

Admissions Help

If you have questions about the admissions process, contact an admissions counselor at [email protected].

Contact Us

Customer service representative wearing a headset

Have questions or want more information? We're happy to talk.

To learn more about the Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction, please contact:

World Campus Admissions Counselors
Phone: 814-863-5386
[email protected]

Kayla McCloskey
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
The Pennsylvania State University
170 Chambers Building
University Park, PA 16802
Phone: 814-865-2430
[email protected]

Learn from the Best

Offered by the Penn State College of Education, the curriculum and instruction master’s degree program is renowned for preparing and supporting education professionals. The online program delivered through Penn State World Campus is taught by the same nationally recognized faculty who teach our rigorous, high-quality residential program.

Faculty

  • Mari Haneda

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Second Language Education, Curriculum and Instruction, OISE/University of Toronto
    • Degree
      M.A., English, Kyoto University, Japan
    • Degree
      M.Ed., Curriculum and Instruction, OISE/University of Toronto

    Dr. Mari Haneda is an associate professor of world languages education and applied linguistics at Penn State. Drawing on qualitative research and discourse analytic methods, her scholarship has focused on the education of K–12 emergent bilingual students, L2 literacy development, language and identity, ESL teachers' practices, and teacher education. She teaches qualitative and micro-ethnographic research methods courses and courses related to L2 learning and literacy development.

  • Elisa Hopkins

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Curriculum and Instruction, Penn State
    • Degree
      M.A., English, Florida State University
    • Degree
      B.A., English, College of William and Mary

    Dr. Elisa Hopkins is an associate teaching professor of education specializing in literature for children and adolescents. She is lead faculty for the Penn State World Campus children's literature program. Her research interests include multicultural poetry, the development of critical consciousness, fairy-tale studies, and nonfiction literature for children and adolescents.

  • Charlotte L. Land

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Curriculum & Instruction, The University of Texas at Austin
    • Degree
      M.Ed., Literacy Education, The University of Missouri
    • Degree
      B.S., Secondary English Education, The University of Missouri

    Dr. Charlotte L. Land is an assistant professor in curriculum and instruction at Penn State University Park. Her teaching and research are situated within literacy education and teacher education. She focuses primarily on writing and writing instruction, critical and humanizing pedagogies, and inquiry and teacher learning. Across her work, Dr. Land aims to reframe both learners and teachers as "transformative intellectuals" (Giroux, 1985) who are capable and willing to make important decisions about their work and contribute to what we know about reading, writing, teaching, and learning.

  • Andrea McCloskey

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Curriculum and Instruction (Mathematics Education), Indiana University-Bloomington
    • Degree
      M.A.T., Secondary Mathematics Teaching, Miami University
    • Degree
      B.S., Mathematics, Wheaton College

    Dr. Andrea McCloskey is a former mathematics teacher of middle and high school students. Her research interests include teacher learning of mathematical and pedagogical concepts, especially in elementary classrooms. She is studying how improv theatre can help us to respond in productive ways to the more persistent cultural rituals of mathematics teaching. Dr. McCloskey advises in the elementary education emphasis area, and she teaches MTHED 430 and CI 501.

  • Scott McDonald

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Learning Technologies in Science Education, University of Michigan
    • Degree
      M.S., Science Education, University of Michigan
    • Degree
      M.A.T., Physics, University of Michigan
    • Degree
      B.S., Physics, Colorado College

    Dr. Scott McDonald is Professor of Science Education and Director of the Krause Studios for Innovation. Prior to earning his doctorate, he was a high school physics, math, and environmental science teacher. His research focuses on teaching and learning of science, in particular how teachers learn ambitious and equitable pedagogies. He also has projects focused on students using data representations and visualizations to develop understandings of complex systems phenomena, including Plate Tectonics, Hurricanes, and Wildfires. He teaches SCIED 552 and SCIED/MTHED 460 in the STEM emphasis area of the M.Ed.

  • Scott Metzger

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy, Michigan State University
    • Degree
      M.A., Curriculum and Teaching, Michigan State University
    • Degree
      B.A., History, Michigan State University

    Dr. Scott Metzger is Associate Professor of Social Studies Education and lead faculty for 7-12 social studies teacher certification at Penn State. He was a high-school social studies teacher in Michigan for six years before earning his doctorate. His scholarship focuses on history teaching, learning, and curriculum; how individuals, societies, and media use the past; and difficult historical and social topics. Dr. Metzger teaches courses on social studies educational research and on history education in the Social Studies Education emphasis area of the M.Ed.

  • Ashley N. Patterson

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Multicultural and Equity Studies in Education, Ohio State University
    • Degree
      M.A., Quantitative Evaluation, Research and Measurement, Ohio State University
    • Degree
      M.S., Reading Specialization, Hood College
    • Degree
      B.S., Special and Elementary Education, Boston University

    Dr. Ashley N. Patterson's work in the educational field began as an elementary-level inclusive special educator. She is committed to preparing educators who take up a critical lens to working with children and best serving their individual needs. Broadly, Dr. Patterson's research interests focus on intersections between identity and education, considering the dialogic relationship that exists as the ways we think about ourselves impact our educational experiences while our educational experiences impact the ways we think about ourselves.

  • Julia Plummer

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Astronomy & Education, University of Michigan
    • Degree
      M.S., Astronomy, University of Michigan
    • Degree
      B.S., Physics, Washington State University

    Dr. Julia Plummer spent more than a decade teaching children and adults in planetariums and other informal settings and continues to teach introductory astronomy and science methods for elementary teachers. Her research focuses on the design of learning environments that support children's spatial thinking and science practices, primarily in the domain of astronomy. She also investigates how storybook narratives can be used to support science learning. Her research includes both formal environments, such as classrooms and informal environments, such as planetariums and museums.

  • Dana Stuchul

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Educational Theory and Policy, Penn State
    • Degree
      M.Ed., Curriculum and Instruction, Miami University
    • Degree
      B.S. Ed, Chemistry and Environmental Science Education, Miami University

    Dr. Dana Stuchul's teaching and research interests include classroom and community contexts (and the creation of these contexts) that enable people to contribute to their own and to the world's healing. Specifically, by inquiring into the myriad of relationships of which we are a part (of human beings to each other, to themselves, to the natural world, to the more-than-human realms, and more), Dr. Stuchul’s scholarship seeks ways that we can learn to live together more sanely, more justly, more compassionately and more sustainably.

  • Anne Elrod Whitney

    Degree
    Ph.D., Education, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Dr. Anne Whitney is a professor at Penn State focusing on writing, the teaching of writing, and professional development. Her research addresses how writing fits into lives — crossing disciplinary boundaries of composition studies, professional development, teacher education, and English language arts education.

    Read more about Dr. Anne Whitney at her website or by visiting the College of Education directory.

  • Rachel Wolkenhauer

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Curriculum and Instruction, University of Florida
    • Degree
      M.Ed., Curriculum and Instruction, University of Florida
    • Degree
      B.A., Elementary Education, University of South Florida

    Dr. Rachel Wolkenhauer is an assistant professor of education in curriculum and supervision. Focusing on practitioner inquiry, she studies and supports professional learning for teachers through school-university partnerships. Dr. Wolkenhauer investigates the development of inquiry stance and teacher leadership, job-embedded professional development, and practice-based and theoretical issues in schools.

  • Xiangquan Yao

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Mathematics Education, Ohio State University
    • Degree
      M.A., Curriculum and Pedagogy, Beijing Normal University
    • Degree
      B.A., Education, Central China Normal University

    Dr. Xiangquan Yao is an assistant professor in mathematics education at Penn State. His research focuses on the nature of mathematics thinking with technology and mathematics understandings for teaching with technology. Dr. Yao advises in the STEM education emphasis area of the M.Ed.

  • Carla Zembal-Saul

    • Degree
      Ph.D., Science Education, University of Michigan
    • Degree
      M.Ed., Science Education, University of Houston
    • Degree
      B.S., Secondary Science Education, University of Michigan (Certification: Biology 7–12)

    Dr. Carla Zembal-Saul teaches science methods and specialized science content courses for elementary teachers. Her graduate-level teaching aligns with her research interests, which focus on teacher learning and development related to engaging students in scientific discourse and practices.

News


Ready to take the next step toward your Penn State master's degree?

Apply by April 15 to start May 13. How to Apply